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and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines and hope that a man who has slaughtered nearly 40,000 men, women and children in syria will decide not to take the next step and use far more destructive weapons to kill significantly larger numbers of people, whether to take military action of some kind that could prevent a mass atrocity. if that is the choice we now face, it is a grave and sobering decision and would put the starkest expression on the failure of the administration's policy towards syria. savage and unfair fight, this raged now for nearly two years. the longer this conflict has gone, the worse it has gotten. all of those who argued for non intervention because of the things tha
in northwest. healthpeak to the world organization piece a director for the eastern mediterranean joining us now on the telephone from cairo. the deaths of nine health workers in 24 hours in pakistan is surely an alarming six ways and. >> very tragic. this is really a sad day for global health, but said they also for the children in pakistan. we joined the government of pakistan in condemning the killings that have been taking place over the last three days. >> while you are condemning the killings taking place in pakistan, why weren't these volunteers putting their lives at risk and in fact, polio workers have been threatened in the past, why weren't they given adequate protection? >> the government of pakistan is organizing these campaigns with support of the world health organization, unicef, international partners. we do our very best to protect all polio workers in pakistan. but you know, this is a huge country and the government of pakistan is of course organizing these campaigns. >> but this is a campaign backed by the united nations and the world health organization. why isn't the wo
of the people but also of the french people. >> following that speech for us was our correspondent who explains now why president hollande avoided a more specific apology. >> it seems as though he is taking the route of truth than apologies or using the word sorry, because that would be very difficult for french people to swallow because after all suffering. these were people whose parents, grandparents, and great grandparents were born in algeria. president hollande would have alienated all those people and not done justice to their memories or their suffering if he came out with a one-sided apology. what he did do was in clear, unequivocal terms acknowledging the crimes of the past. >> it is about as gloomy as a prediction that could have been made about syria. >> we do not see any prospect of any end of violence or political dialogue to start. >> he also said he is worried about atrocities being committed by both sides then theya uninvestigation has found rebel fighters. the secretary expressed support. this video is said to show rebels detaining fighters in a refugee camp. these pictures ar
on the first part of that. >> democracy now! questions u.s. climate negotiator jonathan pershing about criticism of the failure to do more to cut emissions and save the planet from catastrophic climate change. we will speak with ronny jumeau and martin khor of the south centre in malaysia, and then anjali appadurai. >> you have been negotiating my whole life, you have failed to meet targets and a broken promises. >> a year after calling on world figures to do more to save the planet, the 22-year-old american college student was banned from the climate talks here in doha for the first week. she joins us today h. then we look at how the koch brothers are influencing climate policy.politic this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the death toll from a massive typhoon in the southern philippines has doubled to more than 270 people. typhoon bopha is the most southerly typhoon ever recorded in the western pacific and the strongest to hit the philippines this year. 80,000 people have been forced to flee their homes. we will have more from doha after
not to meet with us. the message about our concern, again, not just those of the united states but britain and france come we traveled there as the t-3, three permanent members of the security council who have worked together on many issues. but we did speak with the foreign minister, plus some of her colleagues. again, we raised the issue of the need to and outside support. as in previous discussions, the rwandan government strongly, vehemently denies that it is providing any assistance to the m23, and it has not taken the steps of publicly denouncing on a bilateral basis the m23. so we have raised this, and it's important that we continue to monitor this as others in the international community do on a very, very close basis. with respect to your second question about international support, or at least our bilateral support to the rwandan government, i start with what i said to congressman marino earlier, is that they utilize their international assistance, not only from us in particular, but others very, very effectively and to use it with great integrity. people get it. we are not prov
alarmed people in neighboring countries. senior officials have met with their u.s. counterparts to coordinate their response. south korea's chief nuclear negotiator and the head of the japanese foreign ministries headed to washington. they met with u.s. special representative on north korea, glen davies. they will continue diplomatic efforts until the last minute. >> translator: we also agreed that the international community should take firm action if north korea goes ahead with the launch. >> sugiyama said he hopes to visit beijing to discuss the matter with chinese officials. >> they're ignored warnings over the year when they went ahead with a launch that ended in failure. covering the korean peninsula, we see why leaders in the north are pushing ahead despite opposition. >> reporter: the ballistic missile launch will be the second since kim jong-un took power a year ago. it will use the same launch pad, a site in the northwestern part of the country. before the first testing, officials said the three-stage rocket was meant to carry a satellite. but japan and the u.s. and so
you in, harris. thank you for joining us. "america live" starts right now. >> fox news extreme weather alert on the deadly storm that has caused major problems from texas to the northeast the storm is now blamed for a total of 15 deaths. whipping up tornados in the south, strong winds and rain along the atlantic coastline and dumping heavy snow from the plains to new england. the northeast getting hammered today. some areas are seeing more than a foot of snow while others deal with a heavy wind-swept rain leading to big airport delays in ohio, more than a thousand trucks are sent out, some getting heavy police escort as winds cause zero visibility. drivers say the situation is awful. >> i have seen 10 cars in an accident. i have saw a lexus fly into a ditch. i saw a semi-truck jackknife. all kinds of stuff. >> i have lost count of the number of cars i've seen in the ditch. i saw a jackknifed tractor-trailer. i saw a horse trailer that was turned over. so i think people are just not really driving slow enough for the conditions. >> pretty rough. we've seen a lot of accidents thus far in
of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically th
it is not. america is the oldest country in the modern world. because the american constitution provided us with a template for classless democracy. not the america that she did but certainly that was the ideological template around it. india is important, 1947, because india is the oldest nation and the postcolonial world. and the indian constitution similarly creates an ideological template for democracy. but with the emergence of india also emerged china, and china had a different template. again, not getting into what is right and what is wrong, but these are alternative -- how to run your nation and postcolonial society. and very interesting we received in comparison to parties, won the congress and the chinese communist party. actually became the dominant force in the post-independent state. one advocate would have to be -- because both emerge from ravaged economically driven set of needs. the congress offered soft left. the chinese offered hard left, or autocratic left. a long story, both had -- >> you said long story shorter i want to get to the short part. spent discussing it with
us today. jenna: "america live" starts right now. megyn: fox news alert, the world on edge and the u.s. and its allies potentially on the brink of entering another war in the middle east to prevent syria from doing the unthinkable. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm megyn cel by. just days after he first reported on concerns syria was actually mixing chemical weapons that could kill thousands of people at a time, we get word that the regime has loaded the nerve agent into bombs that could be dropped, we don't know when. the president earlier this here, our president, called chemical weapons use a, quote, red line that would get an immediate response from the united states, and here's what the white house said about it moments ago. >> to the administration any more urgent than 48 hours ago? >> i think we've been clear all week about our concern -- well, probably longer than that, but since this has been a heighten, an issue that's getting heightened attention, we have made clear, i think, in very stark terms our concern about it. i wouldn't want to characterize our assessments bas
to be the best solution for us, the other test is a bio markers tests and that is an indication of the effect of growth hormone on the body and since those effects of last much longer than the growth hormone is actually there the window of detection is much broader and the other two tests currently in development. >> did trials include a wide range of individuals with a wide range of body types? >> yes, it did. >> as the test gone through the peer review process and what were the results of that process? >> as i mentioned the test has had four publications related to the test itself published in the peer review literature. the bio markers test has had 33 publications weighing the background for the tests and again those are in. the literature. quite a bit of research has been done over the last 15 years. >> thank you. mr. chairman, just yesterday the committee received a letter from scott blackman of the u.s. olympic committee stating, quote, given the stringent review process, the utmost confidence in the approved testing methods to detect h. g. h. and i ask unanimous consent to answer this
would continue to grow, housing would continue to improve, but what's been holding us back is the dysfunction here in washington. and if, you know, people start seeing that on january 1st this problem still hasn't been solved, that we haven't seen the deficit reduction that we could have had had the republicans been willing to take the deal that i gave them, if they say that people's taxes have gone up, which means consumer spending is going to be depressed, then, obviously, that's going to have an adverse reaction in the markets. >> what about automatic spending cuts? those take effect january 1st, as well. do they have to be part of this deal? you've got half of those cuts in defense law? >> well, congress agreed they would cut an additional $1.2 trillion in spending. they put a committee together to try to come up with those numbers. they didn't figure out how to do it. so what we now have is a situation where these automatic spending cuts go into place. now, if we have raised some revenue by the wealthy paying a little bit more, that would be sufficient to turn off what
on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea sheriff lazar -- cea chair lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, and that if we allow regions of our fellow citizens to stay unemployed for year or two years or longer, we know from
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
>> steve: thanks very much for joining us on this thursday. tomorrow, friday, that means geraldo rivera drops by. >> gretchen: he will. and we're going to have more with the cast from "a christmas story" in our after the show show. we can hardly wait. >> brian: you just finding this out for the first time? >> steve: who needs broadway when you got fox friends friends. see you tomorrow, everybody. bill: the syrian government confirming it's getting its chemical weapons ready and may use it. the assad regime prepared the nerve gas sarin and loaded it. martha: i'm martha maccallum. president obama is warning assad that the whole world is watching his actions very closely, and if he were to use chemical weapons on his own people, it would clearly have large consequences for him. bill: secretary of state hillary clinton called an emergency meeting with the pentagon. >> the pentagon has contingency plans for everything including the chemical attack. it's believed according to a u.s. source that syria has put this sarin fast into cannisters that could be dropped from planes. these canni
is the negotiators are probably going to use a baseline that is different from the congressional budget office and senator warner talks about getting savings from the tax rates going up on what the americans. as i understand, it is already built into the cbo baseline. so, in terms of getting to that four to 6 trillion-dollar how much are we talking a lot in terms of real savings and in terms of tax increases, and how much are we talking about in terms of coming you know, just a redefined baseline? and then in the other question is can you give us an idea in terms of framework we are likely to see at the end of the year are we just going to see a bunch of top line number $800 billion with some sort of trigger or are we going to see the details, and if we see a bunch of top line numbers, how long does it take to get to feeling that an and drafting the legislation to get it through the congress? >> i would like to answer the second question. >> there is an old adage that says you don't learn a lot on the second kick in the shin from a mule. we've down this road of process. we have 12 fighting hig
. bill: the syrian government confirming it's getting its chemical weapons ready and may use it. the assad regime prepared the nerve gas sarin and loaded it. martha: i'm martha maccallum. president obama is warning assad that the whole world is watching his actions very closely, and if he were to use chemical weapons on his own people, it would clearly have large consequences for him. bill: secretary of state hillary clinton called an emergency meeting with the pentagon. >> the pentagon has contingency plans for everything including the chemical attack. it's believed according to a u.s. source that syria has put this sarin fast into cannisters that could be dropped from planes. these cannisters are designed to fracture so the devastating nerve gas could escape. but it's not known whether syria intends to use those chemical weapons. we think we have it in aerosol form. the u.s. is making contingency plans in case bashar al-asaad leaves the country suddenly and flees somewhere for asylum which would leave a vacuum there. several countries in that region are trying to find a place
experts used data from previous launches to make their estimate. they say a missile launched in 2009 had a range of almost 7,000 kilometers. north korean officials tried again in april. that one exploded shortly after takeoff, but the first booster burned 18 seconds longer than those used in previous attempts. the experts believe engineers may have succeeded in reducing the size of a nuclear warhead. south korean officials say workers have completed the assembly of the three-stage missile. they say once the crew injects the fuel, it will be ready to go. authorities in pyongyang say they'll launch between the 10th and 22nd of this month. they say they're sending a satellite into orbit, but leaders of japan and other countries believe the north koreans are carrying out a test of a long-range ballistic missile. >>> the senior u.s. diplomat on north korea has warned the leadership there. he said the u.s. will refer the matter to the u.n. security council if they go ahead with the launch. >> we will be prepared to work with our partners, including the united nations security counc
from -- as he weifang, there used to be only certain judges that held a bachelor's degree. too often china's justice system falls short of the laws on the books, both in practice and spirit. corruption is widespread. collusion among police and prosecutors and judges is common. most critical, the fundamental question of judicial independence remains ever elusive. the most sensitive cases still remain within the party control. number 3, and finally, what will be the process for future collaboration for the united states and china? i hope this group can talk about it. we have such firepower in the united states with great universities, wonderful legal societies that are willing to share our society -- our lot -- our knowledge brown's rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts -- around rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits -- package ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits? each speaker will take 15 minutes for a presentation, after which we will have a conversation and use a few moments to open it up to the audience. it is a great hono
with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder, experience the rapes, those are routine. iranian officials are involved in that activity but also in massive corruption preventing humanitarian assistance, food and medicine from reaching the iranian people, they are the beneficiaries of some of this and this new amendment would authorize the administration
the other lesson learned for us is to look beyond the tactical level of training that's provided by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some soph
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
is affecting your trip home for the holidays. it will be a very merry christmas for the familiar leave this u.s. marine veteran just released from one of mexico's most dangerous prisons. where he stopped off before heading home causing some concern. how about this. a short-cut to becoming a doctor, a new program being offered by one of the most prestigious medical schools in our country saving both time and money for the students, but does it skimp on training, a doctor in three years? it's all happening now. but first there is troubling news on the civil war that is raging some 21 months now in syria. the international envoy trying to help end the violence there says that he's still worried there's been no progress in the ending of the bloodshed that's claimed thousands of lives. hi, everybody, i'm jaime colby, today i'm in nor jenna lee. >> reporter: i'm kelly wright in nor jon scott. the u.n. envoy meeting face to nice with the syrian president today. while their account of that meeting was lens hopeful we are hearing now even more troubling reports the syrian army may have used a deadly poi
are facing now a possible theory of stearate using chemical weapons. they should've been abolished five or 10 years ago if the treaty had been enforced. so it seems to me, go for abolition of these weapons with good, thorough verification. i worked with inf despite the fact that two or three years before we got it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to sa
with some sad news today. a u.s. navy seal killed during the daring rescue of an american held captive in the heart of afghanistan. good morning i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. when we talk about the american captive, we have a picture of the doctor whose live was saved. he is dylan joseph, a native colorado. he was in afghanistan for humanitarian work when i was kidnapped by the taliban in a province east of kabul. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at pentagon with more. jen, do we have any details on the american who gave his life to save this doctor? >> reporter: they're waiting to contact the family so the military does not release the identity of the seal killed in that rescue attempt. we know he was a member of "seal team 6". not necessarily a member of the same group that carried out the usama bin laden raid. there are about 200 members of "seal team 6". this man, as you said, gave his life for his fellow american. here is a statement that was read by the spokesman for isaf today. >> it has been decided to start the operations since the assessment the
.com/sotu for extras. for all of us at state of the union, again, we want to wish you a merry christmas and happy holiday season. fareed zakaria "gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on the show today, we'll move past the fiscal cliff and talk about the real challenges to the economy. i will talk to the chief economic adviser of the romney campaign and president obama's former budget czar peter orzack, among others. >>> also, let me tell you about the biggest success story in latin america. it's not brazil. much closer to home. then, as the world watches the arab world struggle with democracy, we'll take a look at the problem from an unusual perspective, upside down. how does a country turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choice save chrysler by injecting taxpayer dollars or let it fail and let it lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar ste
with them behind bars. here's what she told us inspired her decision to help these kids. >> i was starting my social work, i got a chance to visit the jail and when i visited the jail first time i felt that how fortunate i am that my parents are working so hard, just for me to get a good education. but there are some other children, just because of their parents, the children are also suffering. so i thought that i should do something. >> fantastic. one word. "cnn newsroom" continues now with the lovely and talented brooke baldwin. >> ashleigh banfield, thank you so much. i'm brooke baldwin. top of the hour, a lot of news to get to on this monday. first, of course, talks over the fiscal cliff. they are going nowhere fast. democrats, they're basically telling republicans, hey, ball's in your court. we'll take you live to the white house for that. also, as the city grieves over an nfl player's tragic breaking point, new debates today about gun control and domestic violence. you'll hear both. but first, the u.s. has long believed syria has a huge stockpile of chemical weapons. now new concern
votes to debt ceiling votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which by the way we have never doneรง in our histor until we did it last year, i will not play that game. >> what does that mean to you, gov nosh, quickly? what does it mean to say, i will not play that game? does he need a signature amrooufl by congress of debt ceiling increase? >> he needs a debt ceiling increase for sure. he needs to get this done. we need to stop playing games and get the big deal done. the big deal is more than just tax rates. it's more than a lot of important things and the president has to lead on that, chris. >> thank you, governor ed rendell of pennsylvania, and alex wagner from the show "now," which is i great show -- >> 9 a.m. pacific, chris. >> what a calculation that was. >>> want to know what a real fiscal crisis looks like? check out greece. that's what happens when a country avoids making tough fiscal decisions for too long. >>> a top republican pollster about what went wrong on their side. a lot of information coming here and why if repu
and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark of night, to find out what was going on, on the other side of the river, and he and his three companions, i
word for it. two-thirds of the american public agrees with us but you don't need to take their word for it, either. just listen to the voices within speaker boehner's own party. there we go. a kent conrad i am not in terms of my facility with charts. it's clear that speaker boehner has needed cover from his right flank before he could agree to any deal on taxes with the president. the speaker didn't have it before, but he sure has it now. when "the wall street journal" editorial page says that decoupling would not go against conservatives' antitax principles, that gives a whole lot of cover to the speaker. when grover norquist refuses to declare whether decoupling would violate his group's pledge, that, too, gives a whole lot of cover to the speaker. and when more and more rank-and-file republicans come out publicly every day in favor of passing the senate bill, that, too, gives cover to the speaker. you really have to absolute cram tom cole. he was the first one on the other side to dare speak the truth about what should be done on taxes and he's been on tv almost every day making
against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the january 1 deadline before and get 30-day extensions. at some point they were working without an extension. medicare told doctors to hold off on submitting your claims for a little bit. that is a situation we have ended up in before. if we're talking months, we're talking about big pay cuts for medicare doctors. that would be uncharted territory. host: joe from arizona on the republican line. caller: good morning. if we look at it logically, sarah is on the right track. we have become a society with honesty as a technicality. you can get more money but you break the law. our society -- you need to stop your people on the show, politicians and say, i asked you a question and you didn't answer it. this is why the doctors in medicar
to us there wasn't anything we couldn't do. there is no limits as to how far we can go. we have limits because we got here late, the language, the skills, but you can be anything you want. and i can't tell you how important that is for a young person to not only have dreams and believe those dreams are possible. if i worry about anything, i spoke about this last night, young americans aren't dreaming or aren't believing the dreams are accessible to them. >> >> you mentioned mitt romney who until three weeks ago was the leader of the party. mitt romney going to disappear or does he have a continuing role? >> i hope he doesn't disappear and hope he has a continuing role. first of all, very few people have done what he has done, run for president and be the nominee of the party. >> and get crushed. >> that's not accurate. he got 47%. he won a lot of states. he didn't lose 49-1. he won places and has a lot of supporters. but he has been successful at life. and i told him this, too. mitt romney is a role model as a person, a father, husband, community leader. he has a lot to offer the repub
. thousands of people take to the streets of egypt us second city of defence on religion and the constitution. at 1-year mandate for mali. the go-ahead for national troops. at no end, the standoff for washington. republican plans to avert a fiscal crisis fails to win back supsupport in the white house. at least 30 people have been killed in southeastern kenya. the deaths in the region are being blamed on tribal fighting between the two communities. more now from al jazeera -- nazanineazeera's moshiri. >> a victims are at least five children, five women. many people injured as well. enya's red cross says they have managed to evacuate 16 seriously injured to a town on the coast. they are still searching in the area for more victims. at the heart of this is land. this is the arid area, water is scarce. grazing land is scarce as well. the orma on the one side, her on the other side the pastor list -- the pokomo back in august and september, hundreds were injured and thousands were replaced. also part of this our politics. kenya is heading for a presidential election in march, 2013, and the politi
. the only reason they're not going to use it is because somebody else, the u.s., has a similar threat of using a similar weapon. as a gun owner, you have to be able to protect yourself. if you are damaged and you are willing to take somebody else's life. that comes down to that person is not going to obey the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or find another weapon. >> i've heard of some stretches, in my time. but stretching from javon belcher and the shooting in syria and chemical weapons seems like a bit of a stretch. the implications of that is that every american should have access to chemical weapons and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they caus
people, voter i.d. laws a disproportionately affect us. if white people can go through all the laws, what are you telling back people? they are less than? that is what bothers me about rhetoric. we always have to make special --there has to be a specialist when we deal with minorities. it there too feeble mind it appeared we need to make concessions. they cannot follow the rules. we treat people like victims, i do not think they want to aspire. >> defense secretary leon panetta visited the walter reed medical center tuesday to celebrate the hospital's first anniversary. it was created out of the merger of the walter reed army medical center and the bethesda naval hospital. this is about 40 minutes. >> it is my true pleasure to welcome me here this morning. over a year ago to host a dedication ceremony for what was then the new walter reed medical center. you are words that many of us that day. he pointed out if his the people that can make the biggest difference. -- he pointed out that it is the people that can make the biggest difference. i would be happy to report to you that we stand b
martha: thanks for being with us, everybody. the driving dogs has to wait unfor the in the leave. it's outstanding we'll catch you on the radio in about 20 minutes. martha: see you there, by, guys. jenna: breaking information in the benghazi terror investigation, as we await news from a bipartisan classified briefing on that deadly attack back on september 11th when terrorists killed four americans, including our ambassador to libya. we are staking out the hearing if case any lawmakers decide to talk. catherine herridge will bring us a live report a little later on in the show. >> reporter: i want to go live to the president who is speaking before a group of business leaders, let's listen in. >> it's good to be back at the business roundtable. jim, thanks for your leadership. originally my team had prepared some remarks, they always get nervous when -- when i'm out there on my own, you never know what i might say. but given the dialogue that we had the last time i thought it was useful for me to abbreviate my remarks, speak off the cuff at the top and spend most of our time just
's just 17. he knew he had to save the woman or die trying. when we met him later he tells us we had a feeling that she was still alive. we wanted to save her, to get her to a hospital. as he crawls closer, he can see her hand, her fingers shaking. cover him, cover him someone shouts. other fighters lay down cover fire. abdullah quickly ties the hose to her legs but unable to retreat. i said to myself, if i die, it's god's will that i die next to this woman he tells us. finally he makes a run for it. the rebels drag the woman back. >> the woman and her son were walking right down the street. the rebel fighters shouted at them to stay away, but too late. aleppo is crisscrossed with similar sniper alleys. some are known, but others do not reveal themselves until the first shot has been fired. despite abdullah's efforts, the woman dies. her son utterly distraught. don't die now, don't die today he pleads. answer me, mom. answer me. she's not dead. she's not dead he says as he collapses. abdullah is left wondering whether her life could have been saved if he'd reached her sooner. until r
with us. >> thank you for having me. >> that does it for us today. join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." >> good tuesday morning. i'm carl with melissa lee, david faber, live from the new york stock exchange. jim cramer is on assignment today. well, are we getting close to a fiscal cliff deal or not. futures are up and the dow gained 100 yesterday. but there is room for skepticism. europe's grappling with the same question helped by some decent uk inflation data today. and a t-bill auction in spain. our road map begins with what appear to be significant progress in the debt negotiations overnight. a whose proposal looking to raise rates for those making more than $400,000 a year. but senator corker on squawk just poured a bucket of ice water on those hopes. >> whitney boosts her recommendations on citi, bank of america and discover financial. is that move by one of the more famous financial bears, a sign of a new era for banks? >> walmart is once again the target of a "new york times" investigation. but does the paper add anything new and can the stock outperf
no brand-new stories and breaking news. jenna: fox news confirming chemical weapons are now ready for use in syria. the military awaiting orders from president bashar al-assad to launch the deadly nerve gas on its own people. what is next for us and the rest of the community. the national hurricane center getting blasted for something it didn't do. we'll talk about that with janice dean. plus one man running seven ultramarathons on seven continents in seven days. why? is the big question. it's all "happening now." we'll start with news from overseas, very disturbing developments out of syria today. glad you're with us, everybody, i'm jenna lee. jon: good morning, i'm jon scott. as the violence rages out of control. fox news confirms syria's military finished mixing saran gas. they are waiting for orders from bashar al-assad. only 60 days before the gas expires and needs to be destroyed. all this comes as secretary of state hillary clinton gets ready for a rare meeting with her russian counterpart on the crisis rocking syria. that could be a sign that russia might now be ready to shift its
that divides russian society. but make no mistake, it is a power play. it's a response to that u.s. act, as you mentioned, a law signed by obama a couple of weeks ago intended to penalize, sanction russian officials connected with this particular custody case and this tax evasion case in russia. >> so matthew, this law would go into effect january 1st. is there any chance that those cases that are pending where the paperwork is finalized and where people are expecting their children, essentially, in a month or two would be allowed to go through? >> well, there is a question mark hanging over those. there are 52 children, according to the kremlin, that are in the middle of this adoption process with u.s. parents. the law, as you say, starts on january the 1st, but it's only a couple of days until then. so unless that can be finalized, my expectation is that that will be put on hold and indeed that's what russian officials are saying, that they don't think this law has been enacted from january the 1st, these children should be allowed to go to the united states. instead there's been a call for r
into this bill and the way he's worked cooperatively with all of us on both sides of the aisle and madam speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the nat has passed without amendment h.r. 3641, cited as the national park act. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. >> i have no fufert speakers and reserve the balance -- mr. chaffetz: i have no further speakers and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the district of columbia. ms. norton: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: i would like to thank representative poe for introducing this legislation. the intill bipartisan in its approach, it creates a means for properly commemorating the cent
as difficult as one. we are sorry jeanne could be with us but we're fortunate to have represented schwarz with as representing a dish in philadelphia, and urban philadelphia, vice ranking democratic member on the committee on the ways and means committee. i want to have a conversation, that reflects kind of the dual nature of the to do list that the public can send it in the pulpit on the one hand when you ask them the most immediate challenge in washington today, with the most wanted ashington to do, they to talk about deficit or the debt, getting the fiscal house in order. but that is not the full extent. right behind that is education, retirement, good paying jobs with very different by the way, talk about priorities along partisan and racial lines. let's start with where we are and where the public not surprisingly is on the question of solving the immediate fiscal cliff decision. how would you describe your feeling that there will be some kind of accommodation deals these on the tax or the spending side, or both? >> first of all, good morning. and just, i'm not gene sperling. but i'm
on the crisis in syria. this as concern grows over the possible use of chemical weapons. >>> the duchess of cambridge heads home after leaving a london hospital. new fallout after an embarrassing phone hoax. >>> and a contractor online. is that fair? plus anderson cooper talks being blinded by the light. >>> but we begin this morning with a look at today's "eye-opener," your world in 90 seconds. >>> this would cross a red line and those responsible would are held to kwt. >> pressure grows to stop the syrian regime. >>> credible use of weapons by syria. >> if that gas discharges it would take only one minute to kill tens of thousands of people. >> i would not put it past assad to use this weapon it's the kind of regime he's been leading. >> where are they taking you, john? >> to jail. >> john mcafee under arrest in guatemala for entering the country illegally. >> he vanished after his neighbor was found dead. >> the administration, are they prepared to go over the fiscal cliff. >> absolutely. >> fiscal cliff negotiations in washington, still up in the air.
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